Tag Archives: telelvision

Meeting Marty “Superhost” Sullivan (November 2, 2019)

Yours truly with Marty “Superhost” Sullivan! (11/2/19)

I had exchanged emails with him. I had spoken with him on the phone. But I had never met him. And this past weekend, the dream was realized. This won’t be a long update, but I would be remiss in whatever it is that I do if I didn’t commemorate this event in some way.

I’m speaking of course of one Martin Sullivan, aka Superhost, one of the giants of Northeast Ohio television. For years he could be seen, out of costume, doing a news break or guest hosting The Prize Movie on WUAB. But it was his 20 year run, from 1969 to 1989, as the caped Saturday afternoon horror host with the big shoes that endeared, and continues to endear, him to a legion of fans. Fans for whom declarations of “gimme dat shoe!” and memories of “The Moronic Woman” and “Caboose Supe” and endless old science fiction and horror movies were immediately familiar. Many of those fans came out to Akron Comic Con this past weekend, Saturday, November 2nd and Sunday, November 3rd, to meet him. I’m proud to say I was among them.

You may recall my interview with Sullivan waaaay back in January 2014. It has continued to be one of the most popular pages on this site, and for good reason; when it comes to Cleveland television, Superhost is up there with the biggest of names. He’s a local television legend, and that is an indisputable fact.

That fact, along with the fact that, having since moved from Ohio, he had not made a personal appearance here in years (don’t quote me on this, but I believe the last one was in 1997) meant that I pretty much had to go meet him. There was never any question, no mental debate; I *was* going to meet Supe.

Of course, given the long period between appearances, his fan base, the online response to the announcement of his appearance here, and his contribution to a new book by my friends Mike & Jan Olszewski, I started having (figurative) nightmares of waiting in the line to meet him. Would it be an hours long wait? Obviously there would be autographs, but would there be an opportunity to take pictures with him? How long could guests spend talking with him? I was going to wait as long as necessary to meet Supe, but in the weeks leading up to the convention, these thoughts were indeed rushing through my mind.

As it turned out, my fears were unfounded. Naturally there was a line to meet him, but at least for when I was there (early afternoon on Saturday), it was never insurmountable.

But more importantly, I had gathered from my phone conversations with Sullivan that he was one of the nicest guys anyone could hope to meet, and that feeling was found to be true. He signed pictures, the book, or whatever people brought from home, and as you can see above, took pictures with guests. But better than all of that was just how genuine he was. He was incredibly gracious and giving with his time; he let everyone have their moment with him. No rushing the guests or anything like that. That’s not just an observation from my visit with him, but something I noticed with those meeting him ahead of me, too.

So no, meeting Superhost did not disappoint in the slightest. It was a real honor to meet the guy, a dream realized. Dare I say Supe’s return to Northeast Ohio for at least this one weekend was a watershed moment? I do! I have no idea if he’s planning any future return visits, but for this (potential) one time, well, it was enough. The fans turned out to show their appreciation, and Supe showed his in return. How cool is that?!

You know, my earliest Northeast Ohio horror host memories are of Supe. I may have seen his actual show at least in passing, but as a child enamored by superheroes, if nothing else the promos for his weekly airings of Three Stooges shorts and him in his parody Superman costume were burnt into my mind from an early age. Even if I was too young to really ‘get’ it back then (I was only three years old when Superhost left the airwaves, though Sullivan himself continued at WUAB for several years afterwards), the image of him always stuck with me. Later, when I got older and was able to actually see his material, I realized just how terrific he was in action. Do I wish I could have spent more time with him when he was on the air? Of course I do. But, I’m pleased that, even in my ultra small way, I was able to spend some time with him back in the day.

(Also, I had never been to an Akron Comic Con before, but the venue it was held at this year was not unfamiliar to me. Taking place at the Emidio & Sons banquet hall, not only was it a very short distance from my house but also a location I was familiar with; years ago, back in the 1990s, “computer shows” would be held there, conventions in which all manner of old electronics would be sold. My dad would take my brother and I there, and it was always a lot of fun. I loved going to those shows, though looking back, there were a lot of things sold that nowadays command some decent money. If only I could go back in time! At any rate, the guys behind Akron Comic Con put on a really good show, with lots to do and see. And at least when I was there, the place was pretty packed.)

If this was my only time meeting Marty Sullivan in person, I couldn’t have asked for more. Friendly, generous with his time, he was everything that meeting these local TV legends has proven to be for yours truly over the years. These are people that really give back the love their fans have shown them. And shouldn’t it always be that way? I strongly feel that it should.

So, it’s not much, but I just had to come here and say “THANKS SUPE!” What a great moment, what a fantastic memory!

Toshiba Betamax VCR No. V-M41 (1984)

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I found this Toshiba Betamax VCR at a thrift shop about 2 months ago. At that point,  my Super Betamax (the machine I normally used) was still working, but I figured it never hurts to have a back-up. I grabbed a random Beta tape that was there to test it, figuring if the thing ate it, I’d just pay the $1 for the tape. The VCR powered up, loaded the tape, rewound, fast forwarded, and ejected, all without exploding, but it didn’t seem to actually play the tape. Still for $15 (actually less, since this shop always knocks a few bucks off), I figured since it didn’t eat the tape, half the battle was already won. Of course, that was just bullshit on my part. I have no idea if that’s actually true or not, but I had to justify the purchase somehow. Besides, you never know for sure until you take it home and hook it up.

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The V-M41 is from 1984, and while it doesn’t appear to have been the highest-end Betamax ever made, I’ve heard these Toshiba’s were nice, solid units. Unfortunately, my first instincts were correct. It doesn’t actually play the tape, you get a split-second of screentime before it stops. Apparently, this is a common age problem with these units, though I’m not exactly sure if it’s the heads, belts, or what. It may be an easy fix, for all I know. No matter, I’m glad I bought it. It has a very cool, mid-80’s look to it. The front is kinda sloped, which doesn’t look all that impressive in the pictures, but in reality, I think, gives it a neat look.

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Another reason I’m glad I bought this machine is that it has a 12-channel selector. A common thing with VCRs at the time, but this one is specifically tailored to Northeast Ohio TV, which makes it completely worth the price to me. Take a look:

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Only the first six buttons are used: WKYC TV-3 (NBC affiliate), WEWS TV-5 (ABC affiliate), WJW TV-8 (then our CBS affiliate), WVIZ TV-25 (PBS affiliate), WUAB TV-43 (a very popular indie station), and WCLQ TV-61 (a less popular indie station). Unfortunately, WOAC TV-67 is MIA. Still, for all I know, the original owner taped Big Chuck & Lil’ John on TV-8, Superhost on TV-43, The Ghoul on TV-61, and maybe turned to TV-67 once or twice for The Cool Ghoul.

Then again, maybe the original owner wasn’t as weird as I am. No matter, I love this machine. Since it’s not Hi-Fi, which is really what I need at this point (even my currently non-working Super Betamax isn’t Hi-Fi), I don’t know if I’ll have it repaired, but just as a display piece I’m very happy with it.