Monthly Archives: July 2014

An Interview With Larry Manetti

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By now, it’s obvious what a huge fan of Magnum, P.I. I am. The show has been such a big part of my life, or at least my TV-viewing life, for so many years that I naturally take a huge interest in anything having to do with the show. It’s why I spent the mighty dollars on a Betamax tape lot to get a copy of the original broadcast of the series finale, and it’s why my mind was completely and continuously blown when I conversed via email with one of the stars of the series, Larry Manetti. Rick himself! Mr. Manetti was gracious enough to grant me an interview, and needless to say, I’m stoked. I can’t thank him enough for the honor.

Of course, Mr. Manetti has been involved with a lot more than just Magnum. He was Robert Conrad’s co-star on Black Sheep Squadron (aka Baa Baa Black Sheep,) he’s appeared in numerous movies and television shows, and he even has a recurring role on CBS’ Hawaii Five-0 remake, as Nicky “The Kid” Demarco. Just take a look at his IMDb page! Pretty darned impressive!

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He’s also an author:  I have been the proud owner of his Aloha Magnum book for years (that’s my slightly wrinkled copy above,) in which he recounts his career, including his time on Magnum, his co-stars, and even some recipes! Believe me when I say it’s a phenomenal read. I mean, sure, I’m a fan of Larry and Magnum, P.I., but even beyond that, it’s just a genuinely great book. I think I’d love it even if I wasn’t a fan. And to be honest, this interview is just the tip of the proverbial iceberg; in order to get a look at more of his career than just one facet, inevitably (and I knew this going in) I wound up asking some questions covered much more in-depth in his book. To get the “whole story,” you really gotta read it. Order it here, you won’t regret it! In fact, check out all of Larry’s terrific official website.

With all that said, let’s get down to business! Here now is my interview with actor Larry Manetti…

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Me: What jobs did you hold before becoming an actor?

LM: Selling Encyclopedia Britannica door-to-door. Selling cars and a tile a salesman.

Me: When did you first decide you wanted to go into acting?

LM: After I did a United Airlines commercial.

Me: What can you tell us about your earliest TV work? What was it like getting there, and what did you think when you finally got there?

LM: After my first show, I called my Dad and said, “I did it, I’m in the movies!”

Me: Was there ever a time when you were just completely fed up with the acting business and ready to throw in the towel, before deciding otherwise?

LM: Never.

Me: You had several appearances on Emergency! What can you tell us about working on that show?

LM: Walking on eggs, it was the very beginning.

Me: You had a role in an episode of The Rockford Files [1979’s “Nice Guys Finish Dead”] that co-starred Tom Selleck. Was that your first time working with him? What was it like working with the late James Garner?

LM: First time I met Tom Selleck and working with James Garner was like working with my Dad. Great guy!

Me: That role on Rockford lead to your casting on Magnum?

LM: Yes.

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Me: Did you have any idea that Magnum would become as popular and iconic as it was/is?

LM: Not a clue.

Me: There was a Magnum, P.I. reunion of sorts on NBC’s Las Vegas back in 2007, featuring you, Tom Selleck and Roger E. Mosley. How did that come about?

LM: Selleck’s show was in trouble and they asked TC and Rick to pump it up!

Me: Any thoughts on the long-rumored Magnum movie?

LM: It’s been discussed many times but to no avail. Tom would do a 2-hour television movie with the original cast if NBC took a brain pill!

Me: How often do you see/speak to your Magnum co-stars nowadays?

LM: At least once a month, and I do autograph shows in the USA and Germany.

Me: How often do you see/speak to your Black Sheep Squadron co-Star Robert Conrad nowadays?

LM: All the time. We both do radio shows on CRNTALK.COM.

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Me: Do you have any particularly favorite roles?

LM: I love each and every TV and movie role I made. Only because God gave me the chance to become a successful actor.

Me: You guested in a 1993 episode of Quantum Leap [“A Tale Of Two Sweeties”]; What was it like being on the set of another Donald P. Bellisario show?

LM: I kept looking at Dean Stockwell. Tough show but it came out terrific!

Me: What can you tell us about your recurring role as Nicky “The Kid” Demarco on CBS’ Hawaii Five-0 remake? Will you be back next season?

LM: I’ll be back till the show ends. It’s a great cast! Good to be back in paradise and Peter Lenkov, the producer, is the best! He was responsible for writing “Nicky.”

Me: What do you think about TV nowadays? Any favorite shows?

LM: Think it’s great! There are several shows I love, Castle, Law and Order, New Detective.

Me: Any other projects you’re currently working on?

LM: Producing 2 TV mini-series: The Ronald Reagan Story and Double Cross: The Story of The Chicago Mob.

Me: Besides acting, what are your passions?

LM: Smoking cigars and collecting knives.

Me: Anything you’d like to say to your many fans out there?

LM: Whatever it is in your life, go for it. If you want it bad enough it will happen. Love to everyone and thanks for you loyalty and support! Don’t forget my book, ALOHA MAGNUM!

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Does it get any cooler than Larry Manetti? No way does it any cooler than Larry Manetti. Once again, I extend my thanks to Mr. Manetti for not only granting me this interview, but also for all of the entertainment he’s provided over the years. He is, as we in the hepcat profession say, “the man.”

Visit Larry’s official website here and be sure to check out his book, Aloha Magnum. It really is a phenomenal read, and anyone interested in Larry, Magnum, P.I., 1980’s TV, TV in general, or just plain entertaining reading owe it to themselves to pick up a copy, which can be ordered direct from Larry here.

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There I am, cool readins a cool book. (Admittedly, my attire isn’t very Magnum-esque, but it was the only semi-tropical clothing I had immediately available. I guess my desperate lack of usable aloha shirts is pretty obvious, huh? Such are the perils of living in Northeast Ohio, I guess…)

R.I.P. Johnny Winter (1944-2014)

Well, this just sucks. Yesterday, blues-rock legend Johnny Winter passed away. I simply couldn’t believe the news when I hopped onto Facebook today, but sadly, it’s true. The news hit me with a total thud, and needless to say, I’m bummed.

I had the great fortune to meet Johnny this past November at Time Traveler Records in Cuyahoga Falls, and he couldn’t have been a nicer guy. Completely personable and giving of his time. Believe it or not, he had a concert to perform after the appearance, but even with that deadline, he took pictures with everyone that wanted one, and signed whatever people had. Such a cool guy. Even though it was months ago, it seems like I was just talking to him. Obviously I didn’t know him personally, I still feel a real sense of loss, as I’m sure so many other music lovers do as well right now.

R.I.P. Johnny, and thanks for all the great music.

Mystery Science Theater 3000’s Retro TV Debut This Past Weekend (Also: The Musings Of A Lifelong MSTie On His Early Fandom.)

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*Standby for shameless gushing.*

This past weekend, Mystery Science Theater 3000 made its Retro TV debut. I don’t want to say that all is now right with the world, but there’s little doubt that it’s just a little bit better place to live nevertheless.

I talked about this right after the announcement that MST3K reruns would be returning to TV via the Retro TV network, which in Northeast Ohio, is WAOH TV-29 in Akron, WAX TV-35 in Cleveland (the station formerly known as “The Cat.”) I’ve been counting the days (sometimes literally, sometimes figuratively) to July 5, and now that the “big event” (as I have deemed it) has occurred, well, I’m ecstatic. Lemme ‘splain a bit…

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Mystery Science Theater 3000. The show with the robots and the theater seats and the so much ripping on the bad movies. I could go into more specific details, but for the sake of whatever, let’s condense the summation to this: A guy and his two robots are stuck in outer space and forced to watch terrible movies as part of a mind-monitoring experiment, ostensibly in the hopes of ultimately ruling the world with “the worst movie ever made.”  Their only defense? Mocking (or “riffing”) the movies mercilessly.

Of all the shows I love or have loved, of all the shows I am or was an admitted fanatic of, in my own bizarre little world of personal mythologies, MST3K is and always be the “big one.” So much of what makes me, well, me started with MST3K. If I’m being honest with myself, perhaps not so much my initial fascination with movies or my need to continuously collect more of them; that had begun about a year before I discovered MST3K. But, there is little doubt that MST3K launched that fascination into the stratosphere (figuratively speaking, I mean; using the term in a literal sense would probably mean death or at least serious maiming on my part). After MST3K had the hooks in me, I was never the same.

Mystery Science Theater 3000 first started at a local TV station in Minneapolis in 1988, went national in 1989 on what would eventually become Comedy Central, and moved to the Sci-Fi Channel in 1997, which is where I, at 10/11 years old, came in. Since I had a growing interest in old horror and sci-fi films already, it stands to reason that I was far more familiar with the Sci-Fi Channel than I was Comedy Central. When the initial promos proclaiming the series was moving to the channel began airing, I was already tuned into Sci-Fi. Indeed, prior to those advertisements, I was wholly unfamiliar with MST3K. I may have passed it while channel surfing, but that would have been the extent of my familiarity with the show.

An added bonus following my discovery of MST3K was that I began actively searching out the oddball titles, the weird, forgotten flicks, even films that evoked a certain time period I wasn’t around for (I’m looking at you, downbeat 1970’s movies! Relay my well-wishes to Keenan Wynn!) BUT, that was just a side-effect of MST3K fandom. The real benefit of becoming a fan was that it absolutely introduced me to a world of sharper, funnier comedy. It became (and remains) my first, biggest, and longest-lasting TV obsession.

Readers of this sad blog will no doubt have seen my numerous long, blabbering soliloquies of love posts regarding our Northeast Ohio movie hosts: Ghoulardi, Hoolihan & Big Chuck & Lil’ John, The Ghoul, Son Of Ghoul, Superhost, and so on and so on. The fact of the matter is that my love of them initially began with MST3K, which as previously mentioned isn’t even a local product. I remember Superhost from his waning days on WUAB TV-43, I had caught Big Chuck & Lil’ John a few times before & during 1997 (and I certainly knew them as local personalities from all their local endorsements and whatnot) and I was probably vaguely aware of Ghoulardi, But MST3K was really the genesis of my whole movie-hosting fascination (even if I don’t necessarily consider MST3K quite the same thing, though I’d be hard-pressed to explain why exactly I don’t.) After MST3K, there was a new appreciation for this sort of thing, which in turn lead to fandom for, respectively, Son Of Ghoul and The Ghoul, which continues to this day (and at points has reached the same fevered heights.)

Unlike some, I didn’t quite get hooked on MST3K right away; rather, it was kind of slow burn, a gradually building fandom. Initially, I was more interested in the movies, and the running commentary courtesy of the silhouettes at the bottom of the screen was an amusing bonus. But, the more I watched the show, the more I found myself digging it for more than just the featured movie of a given episode, though in all honesty the movie still did, and does, have a lot to do with how a particular episode “strikes” me (again, figuratively speaking. I’d hate to think of an episode physically punching me in the face!) The first half of the initial Sci-Fi season (in actuality the show’s 8th season on national TV, though finer points such as that were unbeknownst to me at the time) featured black & white films from the Universal library. That was the “slow burn” period of my fandom. Some of the movies I liked (The Deadly Mantis), others left me kinda cold (The Undead).

It wasn’t until the spring/summer of 1997 that things hit the fan for me (figuratively I mean, because…aw forget it, I’m tired of that gag.) It began with the May 31st airing of The Giant Spider Invasion, which I tuned into due to my burgeoning but not-quite-solidified fanaticism. After the initial shock of discovering that they were even allowed to run color movies wore off (remember, I was 11 years old, I had no real prior knowledge of the series, and in general never really knew what the hell I was talking about anyway,) things clicked into place, the stars aligned, and I finally, completely “got it.”

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The next week, MST3K was absolutely appointment television for me. The movie was Parts; The Clonus Horror, and the fire from the previous week turned into a full-out inferno. There was no turning back now. I was hooked, absolutely, and I’ve remained hooked ever since. Was it The Giant Spider Invasion episode or the Parts: The Clonus Horror episode that’s really responsible for turning me into a full-blown MSTie? It could go either way, and I tend to go back and forth. Spider was first, but Clonus had the bigger effect and is the episode that I hold more memories for and really feels more like the first. Plus, I think Parts: The Clonus Horror is a genuinely interesting, though not without faults, film. I guess in the end it doesn’t really matter.

All throughout the rest of summer 1997, I watched Mystery Science Theater 3000 every chance I got, but alas, my ability to actually view the show was temporarily halted. At the time, the Sci-Fi Channel was a premium cable channel. I guess “premium” is the right term for it. You needed the cable box to pick the channel up, anyway. At the end of summer ’97, Dad decided he no longer wanted to pay for said cable box, and considering I was only 11 years old, had little say in the matter. So, out went the cable box, and with it, access to my favorite show. I had a few episodes recorded, I was able to get a far-away Aunt with Sci-Fi-access to tape a few more for me, and several episodes had been released on VHS by Rhino by that point, so I wasn’t completely Bot-deprived, but nevertheless, I had no *ordinary* access to my show, and this, needless to say, troubled me greatly.

Over the next several years, more and more episodes were made available on VHS and later DVD, I discovered the numerous tape-trading sites out in internet land, and even Sci-Fi joined the basic cable line-up, which allowed me to walk over to a much-nearer Aunt’s house to record episodes on Saturday mornings, something I took advantage of until January 31st 2004, when the final MST3K (The Screaming Skull) aired on Sci-Fi and thus TV in general…until now.

So, maybe now you’ve got some understanding as to why I treated the show’s Retro TV debut to something akin to the Super Bowl. I’m sure many people, fellow MSTies included, probably saw it as something neat but not necessary. Not me, though. It wasn’t for lack of MST3K, either; I’ve got a lot of episodes, and I think the majority of the series has been officially released on DVD by this point. Unlike 1997 me, I really have no shortage of the show.

No, my excitement stems from the fact that, frankly, I think a show as great as Mystery Science Theater 3000 needs to be on ‘real’ TV. Pristine DVD copies are terrific, of course, but there’s just something about knowing it’s out there, being broadcast over the airwaves. Furthermore, as mentioned waaaay at the top of this post, our Retro TV affiliate is WAOH/WAX. This is the same station that Son Of Ghoul airs on! After my ability to watch MST3K ended with the summer of ’97, I desperately searched for something like it to fill the void, which eventually lead to my discovering Son Of Ghoul. It wasn’t a “well, I guess it’s good enough” replacement either; SOG provided a somewhat different but nevertheless intensely fanatical, erm, fandom in me that continues to this day. Both shows airing on the same station is something I could have only dreamt of so many years ago, and the fact that it is now happening is, I don’t know, poetic justice? That doesn’t apply here at all, does it? It’s fitting to me, is what I’m tryin’ to say.

Plus, I haven’t been able to watch MST3K over the air in “real time” since 1-31-2004, and not in my own home since that summer of 1997. So, that’s nice.

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Following the initial announcement, my fervor was further stoked with a “coming soon” promo on Retro TV, which began airing soon after. It kept me more excited than any 10-second promo that consisted of a more-or-less static image and some sound bytes has a right to. More importantly, the fact it was airing several months in advance showed (to me, at least) that Retro TV was going to go the extra mile for the show. The commercial for Rifftrax’s live Sharknado only bolstered that feeling; if it weren’t for MST3K’s impending Retro TV arrival, I just couldn’t see that promo airing on the station otherwise.

Further proof that Retro TV was going to treat MST3K as something special was the later announcement that it would be airing twice on the weekends: Saturday at 8 PM EST, with an encore on Sundays at 5 PM EST.

This, however, presented a problem for your Northeast Ohio Video Hunter: Son Of Ghoul airs every Saturday from 7 PM to 9 PM. Usually, whatever was on Retro TV at 9 PM wouldn’t be preempted by local programming, so I figured we’d get at the very least one hour of MST3K before Off Beat Cinema at 10 PM. Prior to the 8 PM announcement, I had been presuming that MST3K wouldn’t be replacing the Saturday Off Beat Cinema, which in turn had replaced Wolfman Mac’s Chiller Drive-In (the normal Sunday Off Beat Cinema has continued before and since.)

Oddly enough, for as fanatic as I can be about this sort of thing, if the last hour of MST3K following SOG was all we Northeast Ohioans were going to get, I actually could have lived with that. I wouldn’t have preferred that situation, but some is better than none. And as it turned out, the un-preempted last hour after SOG is exactly what happened. Something about it just seemed so right for me: The show that MST3K lead me to, followed by the show that lead me to it…or something like that. It’s an entertaining three hours, is what I’m getting at.

Luckily, the Sunday 5 PM encore saved things for me, as that aired complete and uninterrupted. I was seriously concerned that infomercials would take MST3K’s place, but come Sunday, all was well.

The fact that MST3K was coming back to TV, even if only through reruns (running the gamut of the entire national run of the series, seasons 1-10,) was such a source of excitement for me that the actual episode that was premiering became sort of an afterthought…

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Retro TV kicked things off with the third episode of the first season, the 1942 PRC cheapie The Mad Monster. It’s a mega-low budget werewolf film, and needless to say, it ain’t very good (a bad movie on this show?! Go figure!) Here’s the deal with the first season: like any good show, there was a period of groove-finding. That is, it’s a hit-or-miss episode at best. I’m not a big fan of the first season anyway; I mean, sure, I generally like it, but after seeing the heights the show reached in the following seasons, it can be tough to go backwards. Add to that an installment of the Radar Men From The Moon serial they covered, which I’ve traditionally been pretty lukewarm at best on, and well, it’s a case where you’ve really got to look at the bigger picture.

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Keep in mind, I’m not looking a gift horse in the mouth; I understand Retro TV logically has to start at the beginning, and it’s probably better to get these weaker episodes out of the way first rather than throwing them in the middle of a run of strong episodes, and rest assured, the vast majority of the Retro TV line-up is downright killer (the list has been modified a bit since the initial announcement. You can read the current retro TV package courtesy of Satellite News here.)

It’s also easy to forget in this day and age of rampant DVD releases and/or otherwise easy access, that for years the season one episodes were scarce. At a certain point, as per request of The Brains (the affectionate MSTie name for the showrunners) the early episodes just weren’t shown on Comedy Central. Eventually some were ran again, but bottom line is that they were greatly downplayed in comparison to episodes from the rest of the series. SO, the fact that some of them (only two at the moment – The Corpse Vanishes is the next episode coming up before they head, briefly, into season two) are running at all, well, they still have that “hey these are kinda rare!” aura, even if they’re really not anymore. I wasn’t even watching the show during the Comedy Central days, and they still sort of feel that way to me.

My main concern here is that someone that has heard of MST3K and may be familiar with the Rifftrax/Cinematic Titanic projects will tune in, not be impressed, and come away thinking the show is wildly overrated. Give it a few weeks guys! Things get good with season two and great with season three on up! Don’t judge until you’ve seen Pod People!

To the episode’s credit, despite my general feelings toward the season (particularly the earlier half of the season,) I did find myself laughing or at least chuckling more than I expected to. I wouldn’t say any part of the episodes amounts to “home run” status, but if nothing else, it’s enjoyable.

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And there are a few nice bits, host segment-wise. The bit where Tom Servo hits on a food processor is particularly memorable, at least as far as the first season is concerned (it’s also a remake of a skit originally done at KTMA.) The show got much better in following seasons, but there are always moments, always the flashes of brilliance, that made MST3K so, erm, brilliant.

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From previous experience, I knew that our feed of Retro TV isn’t always the clearest. Not compared to the local broadcasting that airs on the channel, and certainly not compared to things broadcast on most other stations, and that holds true for MST3K in Northeast Ohio. It’s really my biggest and only actual complaint about being able to watch my favorite show on ‘real’ TV again. Even then, it’s a fairly minor quibble. That said, when I tuned in following SOG on Saturday night, initially I couldn’t tell if they were even playing MST3K. The quality was so dark (which wasn’t helped by the terrible print of the movie in the first place) that I wasn’t sure until I heard the riffs being thrown at the film. When things are light onscreen, it’s not so bad, but for large stretches of the episode, it was difficult, even impossible, to see the theater seats (see above.)

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Those were my observations at least, and mileage may vary in other markets or even elsewhere in Northeast Ohio. But, at the end of the day, none of that really changes the fact that it feels damn good to see images like the one above playing on my TV screen. Mystery Science Theater 3000 is back on the air, where it should be. And for me, I can watch it on the same station as Son Of Ghoul. You have no idea how beyond cool I find that. Most of the episodes being broadcast feature movies in the public domain, so I hold no illusions of some of my all-time favorites such as Agent For H.A.R.M. or the aforementioned Parts: The Clonus Horror eventually showing up.

But that’s okay. I’ll watch this stuff endlessly no matter what they air, because I love the show just that much. I guess when it comes right down to it, I’m not that far removed from my 11 year old self, watching the show all throughout that summer 17 years ago.

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Gee, that was a swell movie!” Wait, wrong show.